Craft

Craft

Architecture and design can tell a story and convey powerful messages. In Europe throughout the middle ages, before the advent of rapid and easy communication, forms took on a deeper meaning as a medium to speak to the community, to convey a message or to make a statement about the time and culture. Queen’s Marque is a return to this ideal, storytelling through form and place.

Sandstone

Sandstone

Maritime sandstone forges a connection with buildings of significance within the City and the historic Water Street and George Street corridors. Composed of sand and sea water, and formed by the deposition of these particles layer upon layer over time, sandstone is representative of the culture of Nova Scotia. It is multi-layered having been slowly shaped over the years by the diverse Maritime environment. Atlantic Canadian sandstone has a distinct olive to tan colour.

Granite

Granite

Nova Scotia granite speaks to waves crashing on the iconic rocks of Peggy’s Cove and the rocky shoreline encasing our province. With a unique ‘salt and pepper’ colouring, the granite forged here is of excellent quality and durability. A material that displays both strength and a rugged character without gloss or flash. Granite rocks are apparent throughout Nova Scotia terrain, and can be spotted all over the province.

Copper

Copper

Copper is used to reference various historical and important buildings seen in the City, such as the Dominion building, and the Town Clock on Citadel Hill. It also honours the sub-sea cables deployed fromCable Wharf during the telecommunications boom in Halifax.

Queen’s Marque incorporates copper as a material of significance, but shapes it into forms reminiscent of ship hulls, to pay homage to the importance of our marine past and its continued influence in shaping our City today. The copper at Queen’s Marque will be treated to keep the beautiful dark sepia colour.